Oceana Announces New Study to Evaluate Worth of Ocean Resources to Divers - Oceana USA

Oceana Announces New Study to Evaluate Worth of Ocean Resources to Divers

Press Release Date: July 31, 2007

Location: Washington, DC

Contact:

Dustin Cranor, APR 954.348.1314

Oceana today announced a new research study, Sea the Value, which will assess how much scuba divers value seeing various marine life such as sea turtles, sharks or healthy coral reefs. The study supports Oceana’s ongoing efforts to protect the world’s oceans – and the marine life it supports – from a variety of threats that continue to devastate dive destinations and marine ecosystems around the globe.

“Some divers are willing to pay more if they can increase their chances of seeing a shark or sea turtle,” said Suzanne Garrett, policy fellow and dive program coordinator. “Determining how much the dive community values different types of marine life will allow Oceana to gain valuable ammunition in our fight to protect them.”

Over the past few years, Oceana has worked with scuba divers and members of the dive industry to increase awareness of ocean issues and gain support for ocean protection. Oceana is now asking the dive community to participate in a short survey to determine exactly how much value they place on increasing their likelihood of seeing marine life in its natural habitat. The survey includes questions ranging from “how many dives have you made in your life” to “would you be willing to pay more to increase your likelihood of seeing a sea turtle in the wild.”

“Our study focuses on the real dollar value of ocean resources to those who are willing to pay to see them,” said Garrett. “I can’t imagine a better group to reach out to than the dive community, which has such a passion for our oceans and all of its living creatures.”

Oceana is dedicated to protecting and restoring the health of the world’s oceans by engaging divers and advocating for more effective management of ocean ecosystems. Oceana is committed to informing and educating divers about the many problems associated with the way we currently manage the ocean, and more importantly, how they can be a part of the solution.

To participate in Oceana’s survey, please visit www.oceana.org/diversurvey. Participation is voluntary and survey results are confidential.